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Best-selling cars

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Us, men, will never stop being fascinated about motor vehicles, and to give in to our wishes we present the overview of some of the most wanted and used cares in the car industry. The mare sight on these babies is enough to make you feel your in 7th heaven, the rear treat for your eyes.
So here they are, enjoy our presentation of top 7 best-selling cars:

1. Ford F-Series
The F-Series is a series of full-size pickup trucks from Ford Motor Company sold for over five decades. The most popular variant of the F-Series is the F-150. It was the best-selling vehicle in the United States for 23 years and has been the best-selling truck for 31 years, though this does not include combined sales of GM pickup trucks. Analysts estimate that the F-Series alone makes up half of the Ford Motor Company’s profits in recent years. In the 10th generation of the F-series, Ford split the F-150 & F-250/350 into two different body styles. The new F-250/F-350 and as of 2007 F-450 is called the Super Duty.

2. Chevrolet Silverado
The Chevrolet Silverado (along with its GMC counterpart, the GMC Sierra), is the latest line of full-size pickup trucks from General Motors.
As of 2007, the Silverado pickup is the 2nd largest volume vehicle in the United States, behind the Ford F-Series pickup truck. Combined with platform-mate GMC Sierra, the platform usually outsells the Ford F-Series, which is actually made of two different platforms for standard and heavy duty models, not counting SUV derivatives such as Suburban, Tahoe, Escalade, or Yukon. For the first half of 2008, 231,320 Silverados were sold in the U.S., compared with 274,713 Ford F-Series. With 83,174 GMC Sierras also sold in the same period, the GM vehicles outsold the Ford pickups by 14.5% (compared to just over 15% for the same period of 2007).



3. Toyota Camry
The Toyota Camry is a mid-size car, formerly a compact car manufactured by Toyota since 1980. The name “Camry” comes from a phonetic transcription of the Japanese word kanmuri, which means “crown”, a tradition started with the Toyota Crown in the 1950s, and continued with the Corolla and Corona, which are also Latin words for “crown”.

For the East and Southeast Asian markets, high specification Camry models are seen as executive cars. Since the sixth generation XV30 model, the Camrys sold in these markets have sported revised front- and rear-end treatment. For the seventh generation XV40 series, the same was done, although the Australian-designed Toyota Aurion which is based on the seventh generation Camry was the donor model. The Aurion features revised front- and rear-end treatment and changes to the interior, but is fitted with the same powertrains. An up-branded luxury version of the Camry was sold in Japan as the Toyota Windom until 2006; the related Lexus ES shares major chassis and drivetrain components with the Camry.

4. Dodge Ram
The Dodge Ram is a full-size pickup truck from Chrysler LLC’s Dodge brand. The name was first used in 1981 on the redesigned Ram and Power Ram, though it came from the hood ornament used on 1930s and ’40s Dodge vehicles.
Dodge Ram trucks have been named Motor Trend magazine’s Truck of the Year twice: the second-generation Ram won the award in 1994, and the third-generation Ram Heavy Duty won the award in 2003. The truck is in its fourth generation as of the 2009 model year.
The Ram is built at Saltillo Truck Assembly in Saltillo, Coahuila, Mexico; Saint Louis Assembly North in Fenton, Missouri, United States; and Warren Truck Assembly in Warren, Michigan, United States.




5. Honda Accord
The Honda Accord is the series of midrange automobiles manufactured by Honda since 1976, and sold in most automotive markets throughout the world. The Accord became the first Japanese car to be produced in the U.S in 1982, when production commenced in Marysville, Ohio at Honda’s Marysville Auto Plant. It is also produced in Guangzhou, China since the 1999 inception of the Guangzhou Honda Joint Venture. The Accord has achieved considerable success, especially in the United States, where it was the best-selling Japanese car for nearly 20 years (1982-97) topping its class in sales in 1991 and 2001, with around ten million vehicles sold. Numerous test, past and present count the Accord as one of the world’s most reliable vehicles.

Over the years, Honda has offered several different body styles and versions of the Accord, and often vehicles marketed under the Accord nameplate concurrently in different regions differ quite substantially. It debuted in 1976 as a compact hatchback, though this style was dropped in the 1980s, as the lineup was expanded to include a sedan, coupe, and wagon. By the Accord’s sixth generation in the 1990s, it evolved into a intermediate vehicle, with one basic platform but with different bodies and proportions increase its competitiveness against its rivals in different international markets. For the current generation of Accord released for the North American market in 2008, Honda again has chosen to move the model further upscale and increase in its size. This pushed the Accord sedan from the upper limit of what the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines as a mid-size car to just above the lower limit of a full-size car, with the coupe still rated as a mid-size car.


6. Honda Civic
he Honda Civic is a line of subcompact/compact cars manufactured by Honda. In the United States of America, the Civic is the second-longest continuously-running nameplate from a Japanese manufacturer; only the Toyota Corolla, introduced in 1968, has been in production longer. The Civic, along with the Accord and Prelude, comprised Honda’s vehicles sold in North America until the 1990s, when the model lineup was expanded. Having gone through several generational changes, the Civic has become larger and more upmarket, and it currently slots between the Fit and Accord.

It was introduced in July 1972 as a two-door coupe, followed by a three-door hatchback that September. With the transverse engine mounting of its 1169 cc engine and front-wheel drive like the British Mini, the car provided good interior space despite overall small dimensions. Early models of the Civic were typically outfitted with a basic AM radio, a rudimentary heater, foam-cushioned plastic trim, two-speed wipers and painted steel rims with a chromed wheel nut cap. The current Civic has become much more luxurious with air conditioning, power locks, and power windows, plus options like leather upholstery, satellite-linked navigation, and a six-speed manual transmission. Initially gaining a reputation for being fuel-efficient, reliable and environmentally friendly, later iterations have become well-known for performance and sportiness, especially the Civic Type-R and Civic Si.



7. Ford Explorer
The Ford Explorer is a mid-size sport utility vehicle sold in North America and built by the Ford Motor Company since 1990. It’s manufactured in Louisville, Kentucky (it was also assembled in Hazelwood, Missouri until the plant closed on March 10, 2006). The Ford Explorer was instrumental in turning the SUV from a special-interest vehicle into one of the most popular vehicle types on the road.
The Explorer has also been involved in controversy, after a spate of fatal rollover accidents involving Explorers fitted with Firestone tires.

Both two-door Explorer Sport and four-door models of Explorer have been sold. Part-time four-wheel drive is an available option, and since 1995 this has been a ’shift on the fly’ system with full protection against being engaged at high speed.
A specially modified Special Service Vehicle version is also available from Ford Fleet for law enforcement.
Explorer was also the name of a trim package offered on the Ford F-Series trucks from 1968 to 1986.



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