7-Day COVID Average Exceeds 2020 Summer Peak

You’ve done everything right when dealing with COVID. When it was time to isolate, you took care of things without complaining. You are wearing your mask, getting vaccinated, and eating right.

You might even be using products from Core Med Science, like Liposomal Vitamin C and Liposomal Glutathione to boost your immune system.

Despite all those efforts, the Delta variant caused a higher 7-day COVID average in 2021 than we experienced during the summer peak in 2020.

Figures Topped 72,790 Cases Per Day in August 2021

At the height of the 2020 pandemic months, the United States averaged about 69,000 new cases per day. In 2021, that number rose to almost 73,000 cases.

Although the daily average quickly dropped from 72,790 to 68,326 in the rolling average, the peak number shows how problematic the Delta variant is for the unvaccinated population. 

Johns Hopkins disagrees with the data, showing that the seven-day average rose to nearly 80,000 in August.

What is even more remarkable about the numbers is that Texas and Florida were responsible for one-third of the new cases. 

High Case Numbers Create Few Open ICU Beds

The United States has about 80,000 staffed ICU beds in hospitals around the country. Although the spikes in COVID cases have caused local or regional shortages, the overall availability has remained relatively consistent since August 2020.

The majority of ICU beds are occupied by non-COVID patients.

Although a spike in January 2021 and another in September altered the ratio, the national availability was still viable.

What does that mean for someone who is sick? They’ll need to go elsewhere if every ICU bed is occupied. In a life-threatening situation, there might not be time to get that individual care.

That’s why it is up to all of us to do our part to stay safe and healthy. 

COVID Vaccination Rate Falls Short of July 4th Goal

In the opening days of President Joe Biden’s administration, he set a goal of having a 70% vaccination rate for eligible people before the Independence Day holiday in the United States. The country ended up falling just short of that goal, reaching 67% by July 4th.

Although the three percentage points aren’t that far off the desired number, they could have been reached or exceeded. The U.S. South has staggering low vaccination statistics, even with the Delta variant surge that happened during the summer.

Alabama had only 34% of its population fully vaccinated by the end of July. Arkansas wasn’t much better at 36%, while Louisiana had its figures at 37%.

The Delta Variant Caused a Surge of Vaccination Requests

When the Delta variant surges through the U.S. South, it became apparent that the most vulnerable people were those who hadn’t been vaccinated.

Over 90% of the registered infections came from those who hadn’t gotten a COVID shot or hadn’t completed their series. The percentage of hospitalizations was even higher.

Getting the word out about how transmissible the Delta variant is compared to the original coronavirus infections helped to push vaccination rates above 100% over the previous month. 

When all Americans are accounted for in every age group, about 50% were fully vaccinated by the end of July. 

Biden’s goal could have been reached if states like Wyoming, Idaho, Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Alabama had hit 50% instead of being under 40%. For now, the best option we have is to wear a mask, stay socially distant, and stay healthy.

For some people, products like Neurobiologix and Quicksilver Scientific can work to potentially give their immune systems an extra boost to reach that goal.