J&J Recalls 5 Sunscreens Over Carcinogenic Ingredients

Johnson & Johnson announced in July that it recalled five aerosol sunscreen products. The reason behind this effort involves samples that contained low benzene levels.

Benzene is a chemical that is a known carcinogen. It’s linked to several blood cancers, such as leukemia. 

The recall from J&J involves four Neutrogena products.

  • Beach Defense
  • Cool Dry Sport
  • Invisible Daily Defense
  • Ultra Sheer

Aveeno Protect and Refresh sunscreen is the fifth item on the list. Although the healthcare giant stated that using the products wouldn’t be expected to cause adverse effects, the voluntary recall was happening to be cautious.

As an alternative, you can consider products from brands like Wondercide or MyChelle Dermaceuticals.

Benzene Isn’t Part of the Manufacturing Process

Since benzene isn’t directly added to these sunscreens and sunblocks, Johnson & Johnson immediately evaluated its supply chain after the testing results returned. That process included looking at the raw materials that go into its products.


The investigation into how benzene got into the five products is still ongoing. 

If you’re using a cream from one of those brands, the item is not on the recall list. It only applies to the aerosol containers.

You can find benzene in gasoline. It’s also used as a solvent for waxes and rubber. It’s a highly flammable product that can cause several cancers with repeated and long-term exposure.

Its effects vary based on how it enters the body. You can ingest or inhale it, but the skin can also absorb it. People experience dizziness and an irregular heartbeat most often.

If you have any of the products on the recall list, you’re encouraged to throw the items away. You can call 1 (800) 458-1673 to request a full refund. 

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Hyundai to Spend $900 Million in EV Battery Recall

The Hyundai Motor Company made a huge splash in the automotive market with its Kona electric vehicle. It’s the biggest-selling product in the EV line for the brand, which had a recall after several reports of fires to get a software upgrade.

Hyundai is now spending $900 million on another recall because the battery systems in over 82,000 EVs sold globally have unacceptable fire risks.

Not only is this issue a significant hassle for owners, but it also shows the divide between battery makers and automakers about how to split the charges when problems appear with this technology.

One of the Recalled Vehicles Caught Fire in January

LG Energy Solution quickly deflected criticism of its technology when a recalled Hyundai caught fire in South Korea. The battery manufacturer said Hyundai misapplied their suggestions for fast charging within the management system, suggesting that the cells shouldn’t be listed as a direct cause of the increased fire risk.

The deflection might have worked some for investors. When Hyundai shares tumbled nearly 4% after the recall news, LG Chem closed just 2.8% off its open in the broader market.

About 25,000 of the Kona vehicles were sold in South Korea. The recall applies to the 2018, 2019, and 2020 model years, along with the Ioniq EV and some Elec City buses.

The $900 million figure includes the amount that Hyundai spent on the initial recall effort.

Since the Kona EV reached the global market, 15 fires have been reported with the vehicle’s setup. A total of 11 incidents were discovered in South Korea, with two in Canada and the others in Europe.

If you own a Kona or an Ioniq today, Hyundai advises that you limit your battery charge to 90% of capacity while using the vehicle. It would help if you also considered getting the recall serviced as soon as possible.